4th of July – 35, 50 and 70 Years Ago

To mark today’s 4th of July celebration, here’s a look at what was on television 35, 50 and 70 years ago:

35 Years Ago – Tuesday, July 4th, 1978

ABC
  8:00PM Happy Days (repeat)
  8:30PM Laverne & Shirley (repeat)
  9:00PM Three’s Company (repeat)
  9:30PM Carter Country (repeat)
10:00PM 20/20

CBS
  8:00PM CBS Family Film Classics: Where the Lilies Bloom, Part 2 (repeat)
  9:00PM CBS Tuesday Night Movie: Pocket Money (repeat)

NBC
  8:00PM Man from Atlantis (repeat)
  9:00PM The Big Event: Once an Eagle, Part 3 (repeat)

50 Years Ago – Thursday, July 4th, 1963

ABC
  7:30PM The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet (repeat)
  8:00PM The Donna Reed Show (repeat)
  8:30PM Leave it to Beaver (repeat)
  9:00PM My Three Sons (repeat)
  9:30PM McHale’s Navy (repeat)
10:00PM Alcoa Premiere – George Gobel Presents (repeat)

CBS
  7:30PM Fair Exchange (repeat)
  8:00PM Perry Mason (repeat)
  9:00PM The Twilight Zone (repeat)
10:00PM The Nurses (repeat)

NBC
  7:30PM Special: The City and the World (repeat)
  8:30PM Dr. Kildare (repeat)
  9:30PM Hazel (repeat)
10:00PM Special: The World of Jimmy Doolittle (repeat)

70 Years Ago – Sunday, July 4th, 1943

(Schedule for W2XWV, DuMont’s Experimental Station in New York City)

8:30PM – Fourth of July Salute
8:35PM – Sports Parade-Dennis James
8:50PM – Film: Men and the Sea
9:00PM – Face of the War-Sam Cuff
9:15PM – Quiz, What Do You Know, With Charlie Taylor


3 Comments

  • Wow. Repeats on holidays go back a long time.

  • DuMont says:

    35 Years Ago – Tuesday, July 4th, 1978
    CBS
    8:00PM CBS Family Film Classics: Where the Lilies Bloom, Part 2 (repeat) – 9.9HH/24%
    9:00PM CBS Tuesday Night Movie: Pocket Money (repeat) – 13.3HH/29%
    NBC
    9:00PM The Big Event: Once an Eagle, Part 3 (repeat) 12.8HH/28%

  • Barry I. Grauman says:

    Apparently, “Channel 5” was the only TV station on the air that July evening in 1943, as CBS and NBC “took the night off”. Usually, the three stations that were on the air at that time rotated their evening schedules, and only transmitted a few hours of programming, due to World War II. VERY few homes and apartments had TV sets, and several were in hospitals and police stations as well [for those required to watch “Civil Defense” programs, and to entertain soldiers recovering from the war].

Leave a Comment