Nielsen Top Ten, December 11th – 24th, 1955

Here are the top ten programs for the two-week period running Sunday, December 11th through Saturday, December 24th, 1955. The first table lists the top ten by households and the second by rating.

It was another relatively normal week, with the same familiar shows filling both lists. Private Secretary aired on Sunday, December 11th while The Jack Benny Program aired on Sunday, December 18th with special guest Frances Bergen. Disneyland featured “Davy Crockett and The River Priates” on Wednesday, December 14th and “Dumbo” on Wednesday, December 21st.

Number of TV Homes Reached
## Program Network Homes
1. $64,000 Question CBS 14,796,000
2. I Love Lucy CBS 14,695,000
3. Ed Sullivan Show CBS 14,628,000
4. Disneyland ABC 12,380,000
5. Jack Benny Show CBS 11,977,000
6. Private Secretary CBS 11,508,000
7. General Electric Theatre CBS 11,474,000
8. December Bride CBS 11,206,000
9. I’ve Got a Secret CBS 11,105,000
10. You Bet Your Life NBC 10,904,000

Percent of TV Homes Reached
## Program Network Rating (%)
1. $64,000 Question CBS 46.1
2. Ed Sullivan Show CBS 45.9
3. I Love Lucy CBS 45.3
4. Disneyland ABC 38.2
5. Jack Benny Show CBS 38.0
6. Private Secretary CBS 36.3
7. General Electric Theatre CBS 36.1
8. December Bride CBS 35.1
9. I’ve Got a Secret CBS 34.9
10. The Millionaire CBS 34.3

Copyright 1956 by A. C. Nielsen Co.

Note: Prior to July 1960, Nielsen ratings were not based on the total number of television households in the United States. From 1950 to 1953, ratings were a percentage of households in cities/markets in which the program was broadcast. From 1953 to 1960, ratings were a percentage of households capable of viewing a program.

Source:
“Latest Ratings: Nielsen.” Broadcasting*Telecasting. 23 Jan. 1956: 35.


1 Comment

  • michael shonk says:

    It is interesting to learn the evolution of TV ratings. How they grew out of radio,and how the early ratings where more about coverage and what parts of the country you reach. How and why demographic were created. How the overnight was born. And the chaos today in trying to find a way to measure an audience that watches in different times and different ways.

    In the 70s I had a hard time convincing people the value of demographic ratings while today I have a hard time convincing people that the overnight 18-49 is out of date. Everything changes including how to measure a TV series success.

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